Meg Soro

Product Designer & Tinkerer

I design eCommerce experiences for people. I've worked for places like Lowe's, Kroger, and Cox Automotive.

When I'm not at my desk, I'm outside, usually in the Blue Ridge or Appalachian mountains. I'm an NYC transplant, currently based in Charlotte, NC. I've got an awesome little family, three dogs, and a little place in the country is coming soon.

I love the design community so much, I helped create/found a thriving Facebook community called The Designers' League.

Meg Soro

megsoro@gmail.com
(862) - 377 -5889

megsoro@gmail.com
(862) - 377 -5889

Webstaurant Store

User Experience Designer
Dec 2020 - Present

• Worked on the internal design team creating internal tools.
• Worked in Figma creating wireframes and high fidelity designs
• Collaborated with cross-functional teams to redesign internal tools to better suit current user needs.

The Kroger Company

User Experience Designer
Jul 2019 - Nov 2020

• Worked with Kroger's eCommerce Accelerator team to innovate on the online grocery experience.
• Support both UX and UI design for a cross-functional team.
• Built experiences for Android, iOS, and web platforms
• Responsible for creating wireframes, user testing, user research, and maintaining a
flexible design system that works with the overall master brand
• Collaborated and worked with an off-shore development team to create pixel-perfect product designs.

Live XYZ

Associate Designer
Aug 2018 - Oct 2018

• Projects include data visualization, web, and mobile application design, marketing materials, etc. as required in a fast-paced start-up environment.
• Created a wire-framing library, a design system and contributed to documentation library.
• Created a roadmap/wireframes to merge the company's three products into one cohesive product.

Dealer.com

Digital Media Designer
March 2017 - March 2018

• A Cox Automotive Company
• Helped the Merge team to bring Dealer.com's Digital Media team into the UX org within Cox Automotive.
• Hosted lunch & learns, provided training on UX/UI/Modern Web principals.
• Produced digital advertising collateral including banner advertisements, promotional
landing pages, and social media advertisements.
• Brought a legacy Flash advertisement library of 1200+ assets to interactive display advertising with HTML5 and JavaScript.

Lowes' Companies, Inc.

UX Designer
Aug 2015 - Feb 2017

• Internet of Things connected home project.
• Created and maintained design style guides, assets, and marketing materials.
• Created a design system, wireframes, and prototypes for both web and mobile platforms.
• Worked with the senior designer and dev team on a variety of one-off projects as the project required.

Hi, I'm Meg.

I'm a designer/Momma/Outdoor adventurer

I design eCommerce experiences for people. I've worked for places like Lowe's, Kroger, and Cox Automotive.

When I'm not at my desk, I'm outside, usually in the Blue Ridge or Appalachian mountains. I'm an NYC transplant, currently based in Charlotte, NC. I've got an awesome little family, three dogs, and a little place in the country is coming soon.

I love the design community so much, I helped create/found a thriving Facebook community called The Designers' League.

Meg Soro

Contact
megsoro@gmail.com
(862) - 377 -5889

Kroger Rush

30 Minute Delivery

I was the Product Designer on Kroger Rush, a 30-minute constrained assortment delivery product piloted in the Cincinnati, Ohio Area.

Three Kroger Rush screens

Kroger Weekly Delivery

The modern Milkman

I was the Product Designer for Kroger Weekly Delivery, a pilot project based out of the Cincinnati Ohio area delivering groceries on a set route each week.

TDL Facebook Group

Iris by Lowe's

Smart Home Web and Mobile

I was a UX designer for an Internet of Things Smart Home product designed from the ground up. The design had to take into consideration over 150 devices from 20+ vendors.

Three Kroger Rush screens

Meg Soro

megsoro@gmail.com

The Designers' League

The Designers' League was created to fill the desire every creative has; a sense of community. As Facebook community, it created options for those otherwise uncomfortable in traditional settings (university, portfolio sites, etc) to share their work and to grow.

As the group grew, we focused on expanding our key offering: our community. We wanted members to feel like they could share their work and get actionable feedback from members from all walks of life.

The Designers' League Facebook Group

As community manager, I encouraged weekly discussions, mentorships of all kinds, and sharing of educational content. Engagement and participation in the feed was interactive, critical, and shape-forming. Feedback was given with the purpose to grow. You won't find, "Love your work, check out mine!" on the TDL feed. You'll find actionable and rational feedback.

As needs expanded, we launched a website hosting a resource library, available discounts, and a landing page for the community and it's social media networks.

For the internal team, I functioned as both a designer, founder, and project manager. I managed projects and timelines for myself and five other designers. Content creation included social media adverts, weekly discussion topics, and management of timelines for content including Instagram and our website.


TDL Facebook Group

Iris by Lowe's

The service allowed for complex scheduling if this then that rule building, and grouping along with home security and automation.

The Iris home automation system had over 150 potential components. With such a large catalog of devices, Iris was designed to be modular and customizable throughout various device functionalities. This allowed for quick integration of new products and faster scalability across both mobile and web platforms.
With such a large catalog of devices, Iris was designed to be modular and customizable throughout various device functionalities. This allowed for quick integration of new products and faster scalability across both mobile and web platforms.

Iris Devices Control

Iris puts the 'Smart' in Smart Home by gathering complex data about your home and delivering it to users via comprehensible designs.

Iris Activity Data

Along with mobile platform support for iOS and Android, Iris expanded to a web platform in 2017.

Iris Web Dashboard

Work for Iris is protected under an NDA. Let's hop on a phone call to discuss more about the project.


Kroger Weekly Delivery

Kroger Weekly Delivery was a pilot project looking to modernize the milkman of yesteryear.

Client and Platform
Kroger, eCommerce Innovations Team, Web Experience

Time
Jan 2020 - Current

Role
Product Designer - Visual Design, User Research, User Experience

Intro:
Kroger Weekly Delivery was designed to test and prove out a more direct delivery model within the Kroger organization.

While working with an assortment of 30,000 SKUs, Kroger Weekly Delivery allowed users to build their weekly basket and reserve their spot on a delivery truck each week.

This allowed for customers to order their groceries in a contactless delivery method while allowing Kroger to be more sustainable and cost-conscious by batching deliveries within a constrained area.

Challenge:
Kroger Weekly Delivery had a quick time to market due to stakeholders wanting to take advantage of the grocery delivery surge due to COVID-19.

Launch to local employees and their families to test the product in real-time.

Information Gathering:
I spoke with our stakeholders, my direct project manager, the operations lead, and potential users about what they were looking for in a grocery delivery product.

I also explored our two largest competitors in the area, Instacart and Shipt. Kroger had an existing relationship with Instacart, and I was able to access some cart data through this partnership.

Through this research, I was able to guide the design process by leveraging average cart size, reviewing how competitors handled individual features and utilizing operations capabilities for showcasing categories and branding.

Goals:
Keep It Simple, Silly: Due to the fact that we wanted to get to market as soon as possible, I did not want to re-invent the grocery delivery wheel and process.

Be Agile: Be responsive and receptive to user feedback. Ask for it often.

Standout: Keep the process familiar, but make sure users knew it was a different product offering from Kroger's current 3rd party delivery.

Ideation and Process:
Because of the time to market constraints, I decided that I would be relying heavily on Kroger's Design System, Kroger Internal Design. Up until this point, I had very little experience with the design system. This allowed me to iterate with a plug and play methodology, allowing for more focus on iteration and quick response to user feedback.

Kroger Weekly Delivery launched two months after development and design began. To begin with, the service launched to local employees and their families through managed accounts, tied to their Kroger employee ID. I decided to push for an employee only launch to test not only our operations but to make sure our experience was similar enough to the flagship website to be understandable but different enough to make it clear that this was a separate option from Kroger's current modalities (ship to home, store pick up, and delivery via 3rd party).

To participate in the launch, employees had to agree to fill out a survey form after each delivery.

Feedback and Moving Forward:
The internal launch went well. Through the employee surveys, one comment came up several times was the need for substitution and out of stock communication.

At launch, if an item was out of stock, we simply omitted its information from the recent orders page, leading the user to discover that this item was out of stock when it was not delivered. There was no capability for substitutions built into the product at all.

I responded to this feedback by creating a labeling system that clearly marked items in the Recently Delivered (Order History). In addition, I used this opportunity to clarify the Order Summary section, making it clear what payment method was used, what savings a user received, and overall reworked the typography for legibility.

Iris Web Dashboard

Via the post order surveys, we found that users were extremely happy to have the full look of their order. Satisfaction scores for the Recently Delivered section rose from a 2.5 to a 4.

Kroger Weekly Delivery spent a month in employee-only access and recently launched to the public with great adoption numbers. The service is currently operating at 75% of operational capacity.

The next step for the project is to bring in personalization features that are tied to a customer's loyalty ID. These features will surface items based on a customer's past shopping behavior, speeding up their cart building process.

Kroger Rush - In Progress Order Case Study

Kroger Rush was a pilot program for a limited catalog of items delivered in 30 minutes or less for a fee.

Client and Platform
Kroger, eCommerce Innovations Team, iOS & Android

Time
August 2019 - Sept 2019

Role
Product Designer - Visual Design, User Research, User Experience

Sprint Cycle:
One Week Sprint

Intro
Kroger Rush was a 30 minutes or less delivery product by Kroger. While the larger project had broad KPIs, individual features were treated with care and concern. The In Progress Order feature was a feature that allowed a user to track their order, make updates to items while it was being shopped, and review their order information.

Challenge:
After the launch of the In Progress Order feature, we got feedback that users did not know it existed and/or had difficulty accessing the information.

Solution Summary:
After user testing and reviewing impression data, I decided to use a bright orange button to call attention to the In Progress Order.

Information Gathering:
The first step was to gather all of our user feedback along with impression data that the engineering team put together on the In Progress Order feature. When the feature launched, users had to navigate to their order history screen to view the order in progress.

Goals:
Findable : Because the In Progress feature held up to date information from the driver delivering their order, we wanted the user to be able to access the information quickly.

Fast: Because of our one-week sprint cycle, I wanted to come up with a solution the engineering team could implement quickly, while still best serving the user.

Ideation:
In order to remove some clicks and to surface the feature, I explored several visual options on the home screen of the application to be shown when the order is In Progress.

After an internal discussion with the project manager and team, I moved forward with an icon featuring our logo. We launched the new icon in the next sprint.

Results and Moving Forward:

At the end of the next sprint, I reviewed the impression data again. And while there was an uptick in page impressions, it was not as high as I had hoped.

I put together a quick A/B user test using two of our brand colors: Urgent Orange & (the current) Kroger blue. This test was unmoderated via Userzoom.

By changing the color of the Order Tracking button, we increased visibility by 78%. (9 seconds vs 46 seconds to first interaction)

I also learned that users valued accessing Order History as a tracking tool. 67% percent of users selected Order History as their first or second choice for tracking an order.

As a result, we changed the Order Tracking button to be the Urgent Orange.